Solution

  • Demo Image


PCMβ(PERFECT CHORD MASTER β)

 

 

●The followings are the 15 sets of Q (question) and A(answer)s

Q:tone/A:chord
Q:tone/A:note
Q:tone/A:keyboard(in English)
Q:tone/A:keyboard(in Italian)
Q:keyboard/A:tone
Q:keyboard/A:note
Q:keyboard/A:chord name
Q:note/keyboard(in English)
Q:note/keyboard(in Italian)
Q:note/A:tone
Q:note/A:chord name
Q:chord name/A:tone
Q:chord name/A:keyboard(in English)
Q:chord name/A:keyboard(in Italian)
Q:chord name/A:note

 

●Chord types used

・Monotones

Total, 17 monotones from C to B including #s and ♭s

Monotones
C C# D♭ D D# E♭ E F F# G♭ G G# A♭ A A# B♭ B

 

・Intervals

Total, 8 types of intervals of which the root notes are above monotones

Intervals
minor third major third perfect forth diminished fifth perfect fifth augmented fifth major sixth major seventh

 

・Triads

Total, 5 types of triads of which the root notes are above monotones

Triads
major minor augment diminish sus4

 

・Tetrads

Total, 11 types of tetrads of which the root notes are above monotones

Tetrads
seventh mejor seventh minor seventh minor major seventh diminish seventh seventh sus4
Minor seventh -5 sixth minor sixth add9 minor add9

 

  • In this application, the root notes that become on white keys by using #s and ♭s, e.g. E♯, F♭, B# and C♭, are used for triads and tetrads, because C♭ (B flat major) is handled. However, for monotones and intervals, these root notes are not used. For example, when Q is the tone and it sounds the monotone E”, A is only “E” and so answers such as “F♭” should not be written. Also, when Q is the tone and it sounds the major third of E, users do not write “major third of F♭” in the answer. Regarding enharmonic intervals, the detailed rules will be described later.

 

●Regarding tonality

In triads and tetrads, a total of 18 tones, that added C♭ to the root note of each chord, are regarded as key-notes, and the tonality will be set within seven key signatures including the sharp and flat key signatures.

For example, when the root note of the chord is C, it becomes C major or C minor.

 

The followings are the keys used in this application.

The number of #s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Major C G D A E B F# C#
Minor Am Em Bm F#m C#m G#m D#m A#m

 

The number of ♭s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Major C F B♭ E♭ A♭ D♭ G♭ C♭
Minor Am Dm Gm Cm Fm B♭m E♭m A♭m

 

  • In triads, major augment and sus4 are regarded as major chords. Minor and diminish are regarded as minor chords. Judging from the root notes, if the keys do not exist in the list above they are not used in both Q/A. Therefore, they do not appear both in questions and answers.
  • In tetrads, major chords are regarded as sevenths and major sevenths and minor chords are regarded as minor sevenths and minor major sevenths. In triads, judging from the root notes, if the keys do not exist in the list above they are not used in both Q/A. Therefore, they do not appear both in questions and answers.

 

●Regarding each notation

If chord names are the same, sometimes the notations differ depending on notes, instruments and genres of the music. Therefore, questions will be set in four types at the most, from the ones thought to have the highest usage rate.

For the answer, anything except for the one with the highest usage rate should be written in parenthesis.

 

・Reading and notation of the chord name (in case of C being the root note)

※The items with the highest usage rate are written in the leftmost

 

Reading C major C major C major C major
Notation C CM Cmaj C△

※The major chord is often notated by only key-note.

 

Reading C minor C minor
Notation Cm C_

 

Reading C augument C plus C plus five C sharp five
Notation Caug C+ C+5 C(#5)

 

Reading C diminish C diminish C minor minus five C minor flat five
Notation Cdim Co Cm-5 Cm(♭5)

 

Reading C sus four
Notation Csus4

 

Reading C seventh
Notation C7

 

Reading C major seventh C major seventh C major seventh
Notation CM7 Cmaj7 C△7

 

Reading C minor seventh C minor seventh
Notation Cm7 C_7

 

Reading C minor major seventh C minor major seventh C minor major seventh
表記 CmM7 Cm maj7 Cm△7

 

Reading C minor seventh minus five C minor seventh flat five C half diminish
Notation Cm7-5 Cm7(♭5)

 

Reading C diminish seventh C diminish seventh
Notation Cdim7 Co7

 

Reading C seventh sus four
Notation C7sus4

 

Reading C sixth
Notation C6

 

Reading C minor sixth C minor sixth
Notation Cm6 C_6

 

Reading C add ninth
Notation Cadd9

 

Reading C minot add ninth C minot add ninth
Notation Cm add9 C_add9

 

●Regarding handling of enharmonic

 

Regarding enharmonic intervals where the keys pressed are the same (e.g. C# and D♭, and A# and B♭), in case the Q is tones or keys, it is difficult to judge which to write for the answer. In such cases, write down both, only if the keys exist in both.

For example, when Q is the tone and B♭minor seventh sounds, since B♭ and A♯ are enharmonic and B♭minor and A# minor both have less than seven #s and ♭s, they exist in this application. Therefore if it is to answer the chord name, the answer is “B♭m7, A#m7”.

However, when Q is the tone and B♭M7 sounds, although B flat major exists, since A sharp major has 10 #s, it is not handled in this application. Therefore if it is to answer the chord name, the answer is only “B♭M7”.

However, this rule for keys is only for triads and tetrads. In monotones and intervals, all enharmonic intervals are written with both chord names in the answer. Yet, as described previously, this excludes the cases in which the monotone or root note are on white keys (e.g. E and F♭, and B and C♭).

●Regarding ♭♭ (double flat) ☓ and(double sharp)

・Monotones

Not handling. Therefore, F# is not regarded as E☓.

・Intervals

They are not handled in root notes. However, they are used if they are necessary as component tones.

For example, when Q is tones and C♯aug5 sounds, and it is to answer keys and notes, the answer is “C♯/G☓”.

The reason of using×intentionally and not writing “C#/A” is because C and A are six degrees, it is right to regard “C♯/A” as the minor sixth of C# instead of augmented fifth of C#.

・Triads

Not handling in root notes. However, they are used if they are necessary as component tone.

For example, when Q is the tone and C#aug sounds, if it is to answer keys and notes, the answer is “C#/E#/G☓”.

In this case, intentionally use ☓ and do not write “C#/F/A”.

This is because in augmented chord the component tone is a root note/major third from the root note/augmented fifth and is right in the theory of interval.

・Tetrads

Like triads, they are not handled in root notes. However, they are used if they are necessary regarding the character of chord, and interval.